Login       My Wishlist
  My Cart
$0.00 / 0 items
 
Wildly World
It's A Jungle Out There
 
International Access
Global Shipping Options Available
Home About Us News Our Blog Our Catalog My Cart My Account Track Shippment Contact Us
  Our Catalog

Insect and Wildlife Photography Tips - How to Take Great Pictures


Many times people think they can only take amazing wildlife pictures away from home, but many times, you can get great pictures right in your own backyard.

Photographing Wildlife with Feathers or Fur

Depending upon where you live, there are lots of ways to convert your yard into a wildlife sanctuary for birds, frogs, squirrels and other critters.

If you want to feed wildlife, don't feed them food from your cupboard but instead follow the wildlife attraction and sustainability tips from the National Wildlife Federation so you can be sure you're helping them and not hurting them.

By following the advice from wildlife experts, you will also be creating an environmentally friendly landscape that will be good for the animals and the environment.

Take some time to read up on the species you want to photograph so you can better understand their habits and hopefully take better pictures of them. And you will be better able to avoid attracting potentially dangerous predators into your yard. You might also want to check out the code of ethics posted for professional nature photographers by the North American Nature Photography Association.

Just as with photographing pets, when you take a picture of a furry or feathery wild critter, follow these guidelines:

* Use natural lighting to your advantage
* Fill the frame with the subject
* Focus on the eyes
* Shoot from various angles
* Capture personality

Photographing the World of Insects

Wildlife photography also includes the tiny world of insects. Butterflies, dragonflies, snails, ladybugs, honeybees, bumblebees, spiders are all commonly photographed subjects.

Like animals, photographing insects can be challenging. Here are some tips from the pros to help:

* Like with larger wildlife, it will help to know your subject's patterns of behavior. Watch where the butterflies land and see if they prefer one flowery shrub more than the others. Then stake it out and wait for the subject to come to you. And be ready!

* To get the best shots of small creatures at rest, use macro mode and fill the frame. Your camera's manual will tell you how close your macro mode works. If you stay within the recommended range and hold your camera very steady (using a tripod) you will get some nice sharp shots.

* You should use sports mode or flash to freeze action unless the insect is sitting very still.

* Most insects are very sensitive to carbon dioxide and will run or fly away if you breathe directly on them. So when you lean in to take the photo, make sure to hold your breath! However, there are some insects like beetles that will freeze when you breath on them.

* Keep in mind some insects and spiders pack powerful, even deadly venom, so know your bug before approaching.

* Try to take pictures in early morning or twilight because insects slow down with cooler temperatures and it will make it easier to shoot a picture. Insects can see shadows very well so don't approach from the same direction as the light casts.

Photographs of wildlife can make for beautiful fine art, the type that you'll want to frame and display proudly and give as gifts. You can also use your animal or insect pictures in photo crafts like in calendars or greeting cards. There are simply lots of wonderful things you can do with your beautiful animal and insect pictures so have fun capturing the wonderful world of nature.

 


Comments (0)

There are currently no comments on this post. Be the first one!


Add Comment


Login/Register

Already A Member? You can log into your account here.

First Name:
Last Last:
Email Address:

Select Username:
Select Password:
Verify Password:

Your Bio: (Optional. Introduce your self, and some of your work, interests and hobbies.)



Privacy Policy / Terms of Service
© 2018 - wildlyworld.com. All Rights Reserved.